Telegram Game – “ENGLAND”

C’era una volta il telegramma, ai suoi tempi il modo più rapido per effettuare una comunicazione importante sulle lunghe distanze. Era un sistema alquanto costoso e, poiché si pagava a parola, si faceva il possibile per ridurre il numero di parole al minimo indispensabile per comunicare il messaggio voluto. Oggi, nell’era digitale, il telegramma è del tutto superato, ma noi ne prendiamo spunto per fare un simpatico gioco linguistico. Utilizzando tutte e soltanto le lettere della parola qui sotto, strettamente in ordine, bisogna comporre un telegramma – serio, giocoso o folle che sia! Non ci sono particolari regole e la normale grammatica può essere in parte tralasciata a scapito del messaggio da comunicare. Si possono, per esempio, togliere articoli, ridurre il verbo al participio passato invece di coniugarlo, spezzare il messaggio in due o più frasi, firmare alla fine e così via. Chiaramente si gioca molto con i nomi propri, le parentele, i titoli, i mestieri, il genitivo sassone, gli aggettivi e gli avverbi: l’importante è venire fuori con un messaggio comprensibile!

Bene! Ecco la tua parola:

Ed ecco un esempio per far capire come si gioca:

Elizabeth Never Gets Lost And Never Despairs.
(Elisabetta non si perde mai e non si dispera mai)

Non essere timido e unisciti al gioco lasciando il tuo telegramma nei commenti. È una sfida divertente!


50 comments

      1. Iteresting, Claudio. I’m not totally convinced about the overall meaning, but it works. Perhaps “definitively” would be better at the end?

        1. Indeed Tony!
          That’s what I meant to say.
          Definitely = sicuramente
          Definitevely = definitivamente

          The last one sounds better definitely.
          😉

    1. Nice try, Maria. “Glimpsed” does not convince me totally as an adjective which is I think what you intended here, right? I mean the subject is "light", correct? How about "Ethereal nacreous galactic light?"
      Even so, it's a bit "heavy" on adjectives but still nice. 🙂

      1. Yes,I intended it as an adjective ( I referred to grammatical rules about adjective formulation and maybe I was wrong), but perhaps it seems more like a verb, isn’t it? Can you tell me how to learn and improve more on this topic? Anyway, I vote for “galactic”, then!

        1. You can very often use past participles as adjectives in English (as in Italian), but not always. In your telegram it sounds like a verb which, of course, doesn’t work. I don’t think there are specific rules for this, just “trial and error”. 🙂

    1. I see you like this formula, Claudio, but “lists” are a relatively easy solution. Try and create a telegram with a working verb in it. It’s more of a challenge! 😉

      1. Hi Tony.
        I see you are getting me to change my formula.
        Ok, I’m going to rephrase my next telegram sentences according to your wise advice!

            1. This is a more interesting attempt, Claudio.
              “Logic” should be “logical” (adjective), and of course “nowadays”, as you know, is just one word So you’ve tried to be clever by breaking it up, but what do we do with that “a” in the middle? How about simply signing the telegram?
              Eliot Never Gives Logical Answer Nowadays. David.

                  1. Rematch:

                    Every New Great Label Adds Numerous Deals

                    Elton’s Niece Gertrude Left Again Nagging Details

                    English National Guard’s Letting American Navy Down

  1. Exactly Tony, your smelling skills is excellent! Furthermore, as you already said, telegram’s writing style not always respects grammar rules. Happy 2019!

    1. Ahah! Very good, Giuseppe. Do I smell a hint of Brexit?
      (Of course it should be “New English government” but we’ll close an eye to that one 😉)

    1. I think I get your telegram, Claudio.
      I’ve tried adding a bit of “form” to it to make the meaning clearer. Have I understood correctly?
      EMPLOYMENT: nursing, governess, landscaper. Available now, definitely.

      1. Yes Tony.
        Exactly!
        I didn’t add colon, comma, and full stop.
        You have perfectly understood what I meant to say.

    1. The meaning is not too clear here, Dino. Perhaps you need to adjust it a bit? “Guesstimate” doesn’t need a subject if you use it as an imperative, but I’m not sure about “last and new day”…

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