Past Simple vs. Past Continuous

johnny-deppBisogna mettere tutti i verbi che trovi scritti tra parentesi, nel tempo corretto, scegliendo principalmente tra il past simple e il past continuous, ma tenendo presente che dove c’è il discorso diretto, potranno servire anche degli altri tempi. Bisogna ricordare che il past simple serve per l’andamento narrativo (in ordine cronologico) mentre il past continuous serve per descrivere quelle azioni che erano già in corso in un momento specifico del narrativo.

Buon lavoro!


Who is Johnny Depp?

Last summer I  __________  (go)  to Los Angeles to stay with my cousin for a few weeks. One afternoon we  _______  (have)  lunch in a nice restaurant in the centre of town when my cousin  __________  (get)  a call on her mobile phone and  __________  (go)  outside to talk.

While she  __________  (speak) to her friend, I suddenly  __________  (notice)  a man in a black hat who  __________  (sit)  at the next table. It  __________  (be)  the actor Johnny Depp! He  __________  (be)  alone, and I  __________  (decide)  to take my chance. So I  __________  (get up)  and  __________  (go)  to his table.

“Excuse me, can I take a photograph with you and me together?” I  __________  (ask).

He  __________  (say)  yes, so I  __________  (stop)  a waitress who  __________  (pass)  and  __________  (give) my camera to her. She  __________  (take)  the photo of me with Johnny and I  __________  (thank)  her and  __________  (go back)  to my table.

When my cousin  __________  (come back) , I  __________  (smile) . “Why  __________  (smile) ?” she  __________  (ask) .
“The waitress  __________  (just take)  a photo of me with Johnny Depp!” I  __________  (reply) .

“Johnny Depp? Where  is  he?” she  __________  (ask) .
“He  __________  (sit)  at that table.” I  __________  (reply) .
She  __________  (turn) to look and then  __________  (start)  to laugh.
“That  __________  (not be)  Johnny Depp!” she  __________ (say).
I  __________  (look) again at the man in the black hat: he  __________  (laugh)  too!

 


ATTENZIONE
VERSIONE CORRETTA QUI SOTTO

right-wrong

down-arrows

down-arrows

SPIEGAZIONI SU RICHIESTA

(nei commenti)


Rosso = past simple

Blue = past continuous

Rosa = altri tempi


Last summer I went to Los Angeles to stay with my cousin for a few weeks. One afternoon we were having lunch in a nice restaurant in the centre of town when my cousin got a call on her mobile phone and went outside to talk.

While she was speaking to her friend, I suddenly noticed a man in a black hat who was sitting at the next table. It was the actor Johnny Depp! He was alone, and I decided to take my chance. So I got up and went to his table.

“Excuse me, can I take a photograph with you and me together?” I asked.

He said yes, so I stopped a waitress who was passing and gave my camera to her. She took the photo of me with Johnny and I thanked her and went back to my table.

When my cousin came back, I was smiling. “Why are you smiling?” she asked.
“The waitress has just taken a photo of me with Johnny Depp!” I replied.

“Johnny Depp? Where is he?” she asked.
“He is sitting at that table.” I replied.
She turned to look and then started to laugh.
“That isn’t Johnny Depp!” she said.
I looked again at the man in the black hat: he was laughing too!


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5 comments

  1. 🙂 sorry prof I didn’t understand one thing which has nothing to do with the use of the tenses though,
    when you say ” it was the actor J:D” why didn’t you say “HE was ….”? actually we have mentioned that there was a man so we know we are talking about a man ….
    I’m a bit confused…

    1. This is typical in English, Roberta. On the phone, for example, we say, “It’s me” and not “I’m me”. It’s as if you’re answering the question, “Who is it?”. “It’s Bob.” Since you’re giving the name in any case, you tend to leave the subject impersonal. “Who’s that?” “It’s my brother.” I don’t think there’s a rule, it’s just a typical usage.

    1. Perché è un discorso diretto e quindi riporta le parole com’erano enunciate nel momento di parlare. In questo caso chi parla si riferisce ad un’azione appena compiuta, ancora fortemente legata al presente, e senza nessun riferimento al tempo: condizioni perfette per il “present perfect” in inglese.

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