Who is Johnny Depp?

Exercise: past simple vs. past continuous

Bisogna mettere tutti i verbi che trovi scritti tra parentesi, nel tempo corretto, scegliendo principalmente tra il past simple e il past continuous, ma tenendo presente che dove c’è il discorso diretto, potranno servire anche degli altri tempi. Bisogna ricordare che il past simple serve per l’andamento narrativo (in ordine cronologico) mentre il past continuous serve per descrivere quelle azioni che erano già in corso in un momento specifico del narrativo.

Buon lavoro!


Who is Johnny Depp?

Last summer I __________ (go) to Los Angeles to stay with my cousin for a few weeks. One afternoon we _______ (have) lunch in a nice restaurant in the centre of town when my cousin __________ (get) a call on her mobile phone and __________ (go) outside to talk.

While she __________ (speak) to her friend, I suddenly __________ (notice) a man in a black hat who __________ (sit) at the next table. It __________ (be) the actor Johnny Depp! He __________ (be) alone, and I __________ (decide) to take my chance. So I __________ (get up) and __________ (go) to his table.

“Excuse me, can I take a photograph with you and me together?” I __________ (ask).

He __________ (say) yes, so I __________ (stop) a waitress who __________ (pass) and __________ (give) my camera to her. She __________ (take) the photo of me with Johnny and I __________ (thank) her and __________ (go back) to my table.

When my cousin __________ (come back) , I __________ (smile) . “Why __________ (smile) ?” she __________ (ask) .
“The waitress __________ (just take) a photo of me with Johnny Depp!” I __________ (reply) .

“Johnny Depp? Where is he?” she __________ (ask) .
“He __________ (sit) at that table.” I __________ (reply) .
She __________ (turn) to look and then __________ (start) to laugh.
“That __________ (not be) Johnny Depp!” she __________ (say).
I __________ (look) again at the man in the black hat: he __________ (laugh) too!


ATTENZIONE
VERSIONE CORRETTA QUI SOTTO

right-wrong

down-arrows

down-arrows


Rosso = past simple

Blue = past continuous

Viola = altri tempi


Last summer I went to Los Angeles to stay with my cousin for a few weeks. One afternoon we were having lunch in a nice restaurant in the centre of town when my cousin got a call on her mobile phone and went outside to talk.

While she was speaking to her friend, I suddenly noticed a man in a black hat who was sitting at the next table. It was the actor Johnny Depp! He was alone, and I decided to take my chance. So I got up and went to his table.

“Excuse me, can I take a photograph with you and me together?” I asked.

He said yes, so I stopped a waitress who was passing and gave my camera to her. She took the photo of me with Johnny and I thanked her and went back to my table.

When my cousin came back, I was smiling. “Why are you smiling?” she asked.
“The waitress has just taken a photo of me with Johnny Depp!” I replied.

“Johnny Depp? Where is he?” she asked.
“He is sitting at that table.” I replied.
She turned to look and then started to laugh.
“That isn’t Johnny Depp!” she said.
I looked again at the man in the black hat: he was laughing too!


Past simple or present perfect?

PRESENT PERFECT

Metti i verbi che trovi tra parentesi al present perfect stando attento alle forme negative, interrogative e interrogative negative! Le soluzioni sono in fondo alla pagina.

  1. “Would you like some coffee? I just (make) some.”
  2. “Where you (be)?” – “I (be) to the dentist.”
  3. “I (not finish) the newspaper yet.”
  4. “Someone (take) my bicycle.”
  5. “You (hear) from her recently?”
  6. “You ever (leave) a restaurant without paying the bill?”
  7. “Why he (not finish)? He (have) lots of time.”
  8. “I often (see) him but I never (speak) to him.”
  9. “She (not see) the film and she (not read) the book.”
  10. “You (not make) a mistake in this exercise?”

PRESENT PERFECT & PAST SIMPLE

Metti i verbi che trovi tra parentesi nel tempo giusto. Entrambe le risposte sono possibili MA in una una delle due il verbo va coniugato con il past simple e nell’altra con il present perfect. A te la scelta! Le soluzioni sono in fondo alla pagina.

  1. “Have they done their homework?” a) “Yes, they (do) it all.” b) “Yes, they (do) it before they left school.”
  2. “Have you been here before?” a) “Yes, I (come) here when I was a boy.” b) “Yes, I (be) here three times.”
  3. “Have you paid the phone bill?” a) “Yes, I (pay) the phone bill and the gas bill.” b) “Yes, I (pay) it while you were away.”
  4. “Has your dog ever attacked anybody?” a) “Yes, he (attack) a policeman last Tuesday.” b) “Yes, he (attack) me and my brother.”
  5. “Have you seen his garden?” a) “No, I (not see) it yet.” b) “I (see) the house on Monday but I (not see) the garden.”

PRESENT PERFECT vs. PAST SIMPLE

Metti i verbi che trovi tra parentesi nel tempo giusto scegliendo tra il present perfect e il past simple. In alcuni casi (sono veramente pochissimi) la scelta del tempo potrebbe dipendere dall’interpretazione che si da alle intenzioni comunicative di chi parla! Le soluzioni sono in fondo alla pagina.

  1. “Shakespeare (write) a lot of plays.”
  2. “My brother (write) a lot of plays. He just (finish) his second tragedy.”
  3. “I (fly) over Loch Ness last week.” – “Really? You (see) the Loch Ness monster?”
  4. “When he (arrive)?” – “He (arrive) at two o’clock.”
  5. “You (close) the door before you left the house?”
  6. “I can’t go out because I (not finish) my work.”
  7. “I (write) the letter but I can’t find a stamp.”
  8. “He (do) this type of work when he (be) in Germany.”
  9. “You (have) breakfast yet?” – “Yes, I (have) it at eight o’clock.”
  10. “You ever (be) to Spain?” – “Yes, I (spend) my holidays there last year.” – “You (have) a good time?” – “No, it (rain) all the time.”
  11. I (buy) this in Bond Street.” – “How much it (cost)?” – “It (cost) £100.”
  12. I (lose) my black gloves. You (see) them?” – “No, when you (lose) them?” – “I don’t know. I (wear) them to the theatre last night.” – “Maybe you (leave) them there.”
  13. “I (read) his books when I was at school. I (enjoy) them very much.”
  14. “Do you know that lady who just (leave) the shop?” – “Yes, she is Miss Thrift. Is she a customer of yours?” – “Not exactly. She (come) into my shop lots of times but she never (buy) anything.”
  15. “He (leave) the house at seven o’clock.” – “Where he (go)?” – “I (not see) where he (go).”
  16. “You (like) your last job?” – “I (like) it in the beginning.”
  17. “That is Mr Minus who teaches me mathematics. He (not have) time to teach me much because I only (start) lessons a week ago.”
  18. “You ever (try) to stop smoking?” – “Yes, I (try) last year, but then I (find) that I was getting fat so I (start) again.
  19. “Where you (find) this knife?” – “I (find) it in the garden.” – “Why you (not leave) it there?”
  20. “You (see) today’s paper?” – “No, anything interesting (happen)?” – “Yes, some of the patients (escape) from our local mental hospital.”
  21. “I just (receive) a letter that says we (not pay) our last gas bill. I (not give) you the money for that last week?” – “Yes, but I’m afraid I (spend) it on other things.”
  22. “You (finish) checking his thesis?” – “No, I (check) about half of it.”
  23. “What are all those people looking at?” – “There (be) an accident.” – “You (see) what (happen)?” – “Yes, a motor cycle (run) into a lorry.”
  24. “I (phone) you twice yesterday and (get) no answer.”
  25. “When I (buy) my new house I (ask) for a telephone. The Post Office (tell) me to wait, but I (wait) for a year now and my phone still (not come).”

ATTENZIONE
VERSIONE CORRETTA QUI SOTTO

right-wrong

down-arrows

down-arrows


PRESENT PERFECT

  1. “Would you like some coffee? I have just made some.”
  2. “Where have you been?” – “I’ve been to the dentist.”
  3. “I haven’t finished the newspaper yet.”
  4. “Someone has taken my bicycle.”
  5. Have you heard from her recently?”
  6. Have you ever left a restaurant without paying the bill?”
  7. “Why hasn’t he finished? He’s had lots of time.”
  8. “I have often seen him but I have never spoken to him.”
  9. “She hasn’t seen the film and she hasn’t read the book.”
  10. Haven’t you made a mistake in this exercise?”

PRESENT PERFECT & PAST SIMPLE

  1. “Have they done their homework?” a) “Yes, they have done it all.” b) “Yes, they did it before they left school.”
  2. “Have you been here before?” a) “Yes, I came here when I was a boy.” b) “Yes, I’ve been here three times.”
  3. “Have you paid the phone bill?” a) “Yes, I’ve paid the phone bill and the gas bill.” b) “Yes, I paid it while you were away.”
  4. “Has your dog ever attacked anybody?” a) “Yes, he attacked a policeman last Tuesday.” b) “Yes, he’s attacked me and my brother.”
  5. “Have you seen his garden?” a) “No, I haven’t seen it yet.” b) “I saw the house on Monday but I didn’t see* the garden.”

* Possibile seconda formulazione: “but I haven’t seen the garden.” Solo nel caso in cui chi parla nutre ancora delle speranze di poter vedere il giardino qualche giorno.


PRESENT PERFECT vs. PAST SIMPLE

  1. “Shakespeare wrote a lot of plays.”
  2. “My brother’s written a lot of plays. He’s just finished his second tragedy.”
  3. “I flew over Loch Ness last week.” – “Really? Did you see the Loch Ness monster?”
  4. “When did he arrive?” – “He arrived at two o’clock.”
  5. Did you close the door before you left the house?”
  6. “I can’t go out because I haven’t finished my work.”
  7. “I’ve written the letter but I can’t find a stamp.”
  8. “He did this type of work when he was in Germany.”
  9. Have you had breakfast yet?” – “Yes, I had it at eight o’clock.”
  10. Have you ever been to Spain?” – “Yes, I spent my holidays there last year.” – “Did you have a good time?” – “No, it rained all the time.”
  11. I bought this in Bond Street.” – “How much did it cost?” – “It cost £100.”
  12. I’ve lost my black gloves. Have you seen them?” – “No, when did you lose them?” – “I don’t know. I wore them to the theatre last night.” – “Maybe you left them there.”
  13. “I read his books when I was at school. I enjoyed them very much.”
  14. “Do you know that lady who’s just left the shop?” – “Yes, she is Miss Thrift. Is she a customer of yours?” – “Not exactly. She’s come into my shop lots of times but she’s never bought anything.”
  15. “He left the house at seven o’clock.” – “Where did he go?” – “I didn’t see where he went.”
  16. Did you like your last job?” – “I liked it in the beginning.”
  17. “That is Mr Minus who teaches me mathematics. He hasn’t had time to teach me much because I only started lessons a week ago.”
  18. Have you ever tried to stop smoking?” – “Yes, I tried last year, but then I found that I was getting fat so I started* again.
  19. “Where did you find this knife?” – “I found it in the garden.” – “Why didn’t you leave it there?”
  20. Have you seen today’s paper?” – “No, has anything interesting happened?” – “Yes, some of the patients have escaped from our local mental hospital.”
  21. “I have just received a letter that says we haven’t paid** our last gas bill. Didn’t I give you the money for that last week?” – “Yes, but I’m afraid I spent*** it on other things.”
  22. Have you finished checking his thesis?” – “No, I’ve checked about half of it.”
  23. “What are all those people looking at?” – “There has been an accident.” – “Did you see what happened?” – “Yes, a motor cycle ran into a lorry.”
  24. “I phoned you twice yesterday and got no answer.”
  25. “When I bought my new house I asked for a telephone. The Post Office told me to wait, but I’ve waited for a year now and my phone still hasn’t come.”

* Possibile seconda formulazione: “…I’ve started again.” Solo nel caso in cui chi parla ha appena ricominciato a fumare.
** Possibile seconda formulazione: “…says we didn’t pay our last gas bill.” Solo nel caso in cui chi parla si riferisce più alla data di scadenza dell’ultima bolletta e non tanto al fatto che dovrà comunque pagarla.
*** Possibile seconda formulazione: “…I’m afraid I’ve spent it on other things.” Solo nel caso in cui chi parla vuole mettere l’enfasi sul fatto che i soldi non ci sono più piuttosto che sulle spese fatte.


Past simple or present perfect: an introduction

Capire, o meglio, cominciare a capire la differenza tra il past simple e il present perfect
è fondamentale nel cammino verso il livello intermedio.
Quando si usa l’uno e quando si usa l’altro?
La risposta non è facile…

La prima cosa da stabilire è che non sempre si può fare paragone tra l’inglese e l’italiano per sciogliere il nodo del problema. Mentre in italiano il tempo fondamentale per parlare del passato è il passato prossimo e si può fare a meno (effettivamente) del passato remoto, in inglese vengono usati sia il present perfect che il past simple seguendo dei criteri ben precisi. Il risultato di questa differenza fondamentale tra le due lingue in termini pratici è che quando si traduce dall’inglese all’italiano non importa se il verbo originale in inglese è al past simple o al present perfect perché nella versione italiana si mette tutto al passato prossimo. Invece quando si traduce dall’italiano all’inglese bisognerà sapere scegliere tra il present perfect (come in italiano) o il past simple (improponibile in italiano). Ecco dove sta il problema. Quindi quello che dobbiamo esaminare è esattamente come funzionano il past simple e il present perfect in inglese. Preparati, il viaggio sarà arduo!

Cerchiamo di fare una prima importante distinzione:

  • Past Simple: viene usato per attenzionare o parlare di un evento avvenuto in un contesto temporale passato ben precisato. Il contesto temporale è una parte fondamentale della frase e viene espresso esplicitamente oppure è implicito nel significato o nel contesto della frase.
  • Present Perfect: viene usato per attenzionare o parlare di un evento avvenuto in un contesto temporale passato non specificato, ignoto, tenuto vago o di nessuna rilevanza. Il contesto temporale ha poca o nessuna importanza in quanto l’evento passato ci interesse solo come azione e, molto spesso, serve più che altro come punto di riferimento per una questione che invece riguarda prettamente il presente (da qui il nome PRESENT perfect).

 Il contesto temporale quindi è la chiave di distinzione tra i due tempi. A questo punto vediamo da vicino cosa intendiamo quando diciamo, “una questione che riguarda prettamente il presente”.

  • Bob has gone out.
  • Bob è uscito.

Non importa il contesto temporale in cui Bob è uscito ma il fatto che adesso non c’è.

  • I have lost my keys.
  • Ho perso le mie chiavi.

Non importa il contesto temporale in cui ho perse le chiavi ma il fatto che adesso non le trovo.

  • We have bought a new car.
  • Abbiamo comprato una macchina nuova.

Non importa il contesto temporale in cui abbiamo comprato la macchina ma il fatto che adesso l’abbiamo.

  • Bob has broken his leg.
  • Bob si è rotto la gamba.

Non importa il contesto temporale in cui Bob si è rotto la gamba ma il fatto che adesso ha la gamba rotta.

In ognuno di questi esempi l’uso del passato prossimo dirige la nostra attenzione dall’azione passata verso il risultato presente. Questo risvolto al presente è una delle chiavi di lettura di base per l’uso del present perfect in inglese.


Vediamo adesso cosa succede invece quando spostiamo la nostra attenzione verso un contesto temporale ben precisato:

  • Bob went out two minutes ago.
  • Bob è uscito due minuti fa.

È ben precisato il contesto temporale e di conseguenza il verbo è al past simple. La nostra attenzione è ancorata nel passato e slegato dal presente. Sarà così anche per le altre frasi:

  • I lost my keys at Bob’s party yesterday evening.
  • Ho perso le mie chiavi alla festa di Bob ieri sera.
  • We bought a new car last week.
  • Abbiamo comprato una macchina nuova la settimana scorsa.
  • Bob broke his leg on Monday.
  • Bob si è rotto la gamba lunedì.

(A proposito del pericolo di mettere a confronto le due lingue, è da notare che anche se il tempo dei verbi in inglese è cambiato dal present perfect al past simple con l’aggiunta di questi avverbi di tempo, in italiano è rimasto immutato: sempre passato prossimo!)

Se devi tradurre una frase dall’italiano in inglese e non sei sicuro se usare il past simple o il present perfect, prova a chiederti QUANDO è successo l’evento. Se la risposta si articola in un momento nel passato ben precisato allora devi usare il past simple. Se invece la risposta è boh, non so, non mi interesse o è semplicemente molto vago, allora devi usare il present perfect.

  • Si usa il present perfect per stabilire un forte legame col presente.
  • Si usa il past simple per ancorare nel passato e slegare dal presente.

Aggiungiamo adesso un altro fattore importante che allarga notevolmente la sfera di attività del present perfect: il fattore ‘esperienze di vita‘. Sempre con riferimento alla prova di QUANDO, capita a volte che l’unica risposta sensata è ‘a qualche punto della mia vita‘, cioè da quando sono nato fino ad adesso. Anche in questo caso, visto che il momento esatto non si può collocare sulla linea del tempo e non ci interessa particolarmente, il tempo da usare è il present perfect:

  • I have seen this film five times.
  • Ho visto questo film cinque volte.
  • Bob has travelled a lot.
  • Bob ha viaggiato molto.
  • Have you read “Macbeth”?
  • Hai letto “Macbeth”?
  • We haven’t been to Spain.
  • Non siamo stati in Spagna.

In ognuno di questi esempi si parla di eventi fattti o non fatti, uno o più volte, in un arco di tempo non specificato ma che implicitamente si estende dalla nascita fino al momento attuale.


Vediamo adesso cosa succede invece quando spostiamo la nostra attenzione verso un contesto temporale ben precisato:

  • I saw this film five times in the 80’s.
  • Ho visto questo film cinque volte negli anni 80.

È ben precisato il contesto temporale e di conseguenza il verbo è al past simple. La nostra attenzione è ancorata nel passato e slegata dal presente. Sarà così anche per le altre frasi:

  • Bob travelled a lot when he was a student.
  • Bob ha viaggiato molto quando era uno studente.
  • Did you read “Macbeth” when you were at school?
  • Hai letto “Macbeth” quando eri a scuola?
  • We didn‘t go to Spain last year.
  • Non siamo stati nella Spagna l’anno scorso.

Se l’unico riferimento temporale implicito in una frase è quello di nell’arco della vita oppure a qualche punto nella vita, allora devi usare il present perfect.

  • Il present perfect indica un evento che è successo a qualche punto della vita e che potrebbe succedere ancora.
  • Il past simple si focalizza esclusivamente su un evento passato che è avvenuto in un contesto temporale ormai chiuso.

A questo punto possiamo dare un’occhiata agli avverbi di tempo che vanno associati al past simple e quelli che invece si prestano bene al present perfect:

Past simple: yesterday, two days ago, on Friday, last week, at half past ten, in July, in 1982, in the 18th century, when I was young, when I lived in Spain…

Present perfect: just, recently, lately, yet, still, already, always, ever, never, so far, the first time, for, since…

Per quanto riguarda il past simple l’uso di questi avverbi di tempo dovrebbe essere già abbastanza ovvio in quanto vanno messi come sempre alla fine della frase per definire il contesto temporale in cui l’evento è avvenuto. Per quanto riguarda il present perfect invece potrebbe essere utile qualche esempio dell’uso corretto:

  • just ~ appena, molto recentemente
  • recently / lately ~ recentemente, ultimamente
  • yet / still ~ ancora
  • already ~ già
  • always ~ sempre
  • ever / never ~ mai / non mai
  • so far ~ finora
  • the first time ~ la prima volta
  • for / since ~ da / sin da

(Gli avverbi evidenziati sono link per un eventuale approfondimento)

Tutti questi avverbi di tempo funzionano bene col present perfect perché non creano un contesto temporale ben precisato nel passato e hanno un significato molto legato al presente: condizioni perfette per il present perfect.

  • Jane has just come back from America.
  • Jane è appena tornata dall’America.
  • Bob has worked hard recently.
  • Bob ha lavorato sodo recentemente.
  •  They haven’t witten to us lately.
  • Non ci hanno scritto ultimamente.
  • The concert hasn’t finished yet.
  • Il concerto non è finito ancora.
  • She still hasn’t made an appointment.
  • Ancora non ha fissato un appuntamento.
  • We have already had breakfast.
  • Abbiamo già fatto colazione.
  • Have you always worn glasses?
  • Hai sempre portato occhiali?
  • Have you ever eaten fogs’ legs?
  • Avete mai mangiato cosce di rana?
  • Bob has never played tennis.
  • Bob non ha mai giocato a tennis.
  • I have only read the first chapter so far.
  • Ho letto soltanto il primo capitolo finora.
  • It’s the first time Bob has sung in public.
  • È la prima volta che Bob canta (ha cantato) in pubblico.

Per l’uso di for e since dobbiamo fare un’importante premessa. C’è una tipologia di frase in inglese che si chiama la duration form. Si tratta di un’azione che inizia nel passato a prosegue nel presente. In italiano questo tipo di frase viene elaborata con il verbo al presente ma in inglese si fa nuovamente ricorso al present perfect. Questa differenza netta nella scelta del tempo per esprimere lo stesso concetto è causa di continui errori di traduzione. Vediamo qualche esempio:

  • Bob has lived in Rome for 5 years.
  • Bob abita a Roma da 5 anni.
  •  I have known Tom since 1982
  • Conosco Tom dal 1982.
  • Jane has worked here since she left school.
  • Jane lavora qui da quando ha lasciato la scuola.

Sia for che since si traducono con da in italiano ma in inglese una differenza c’è. Si usa for quando si specifica il tempo in termini di durata (five minutes, ten hours, three days, two weeks, eight months, a long time, ages). Invece si usa since quando si specifica il momento in cui l’azione è iniziata (yesterday, ten o’clock, Saturday, last week, September, 1959, the 17th century, I was a child, I left school). Da notare che dove in italiano ci starebbe sin da (anche se non viene usato), in inglese ci vuole since.

N.B. Se la stessa frase viene elaborata con il past simple, indica un’azione conclusa e la preposizione for significa per e non più da.

  • Bob lived in Rome for 5 years.
  • Bob ha abitato a Roma per 5 anni.

Se l’avverbio di tempo indica un tempo vago, incompiuto o che include il presente, allora è normalmente indicato l’uso del present perfect.

Mappa Concettuale


La questione degli avverbi di tempo si complica un po’ quando si tratta di avverbi di tempo non conclusi: today (se è ancora oggi), this morning (se è ancora mattina), this week (se la settimana è ancora in corso) e così via. La logica ci dice che avverbi di tempo di questo genere vanno elaborati con il present perfect e normalmente è così – ma non sempre!

Vediamo un esempio pratico: “Hai visto Tom oggi?”

  • Have you seen Tom today?
  • Did you see Tom today?

Entrambi le risposte sono possibili ma nascono da premesse diverse. Nel primo caso, chi fa la domanda pensa che anche se l’altra persona non abbia visto Tom, potrebbe ancora vederlo a qualche punto nella giornata. Nel secondo caso chi fa la domanda sa che se l’altra persona non ha ancora visto Tom, non lo vedrà più quel giorno. In pratica, questi avverbi di tempo possono essere usati con un senso di tempo aperto o chiuso in base al messaggio che si vuole comunicare.

Vediamo un altro esempio: “È venuto il postino stamattina?”

  • Has the postman come this morning?
  • Did the postman come this morning?

Nel primo caso, chi fa la domanda lascia aperta la possibilità che il postino potrebbe ancora venire se non è venuto già. Nel secondo caso, chi fa la domanda sa che il postino viene sempre entro una certa ora e poiché quell’ora è già passata da un po’, chiude il discorso con il past simple anche se la mattina è ancora in corso.

Forse sembrerà tutto molto cerebrale ma per un inglese la scelta tra questi due tempi è assolutamente istintiva in quanto la regola viene assimilato in maniera indolore da bambino!


Infine, un ultimo esempio che serve, non per complicare la questione ulteriormente, me per cercare di far capire fino in fondo quanto è importante la questione del legame col presente per l’uso del present perfect. Come dobbiamo tradurre la frase, “Ho comprato queste scarpe in Oxford Street.”

In base a quanto già spiegato qui sopra, si direbbe: “I have bought these shoes in Oxford Street.” Sembra ovvio, no? Alla domanda QUANDO non troviamo una risposta ben precisata nel passato e quindi scegliamo il present perfect. Ma in questo caso si sbaglia. Una risposta in realtà c’è ed è, “Quando ero in Oxford Street.” Al posto di un avverbio di tempo ben precisato al passato c’è un avverbio di luogo che però supplisce benissimo l’avverbio di tempo slegando l’azione dal presente e ancorandolo nel passato. Un’altro esempio potrebbe essere, “Ho visto questo film a casa di Bob.” Quando? Quando ero a casa di Bob e quindi, “I saw this film at Bob’s house.”

Un avverbio di luogo può supplire un avverbio di tempo ben precisata al passato, slegando l’azione dal presente e ancorandola nel passato.


A questo punto potrebbe essere utile approfondire con le seguenti schede didattiche:

  1. Present Perfect Simple (indefinite past) ~ “risultato evidente nel presente”
  2. Present Perfect Simple (indefinite past) ~ “esperienze di vita”
  3. Present Perfect Simple (unfinished past) ~ “periodo di tempo non concluso”
  4. Present Perfect Simple (unfinished past) ~ “comincia nel passato e continua nel presente”
  5. For / Since ~ “da, sin da, da quando”

Mettiti alla prova QUI



CONTRIBUTI VOLONTARI

Adesso puoi sostenere Ingliando con una libera donazione.

€5.00



Master Translator: Exercise 3

past continuous
[vedi articolo]
• intermediate •

  1. Cosa facevano tutti quando lo spettacolo è cominciato?
  • Se vuoi un riscontro diretto, lascia le tue versioni nei commenti.
  • Altrimenti aspetta che pubblico le mie versioni tra qualche giorno.
  • Non guardare i commenti degli altri se non vuoi farti influenzare.

BUON LAVORO!


%d bloggers like this: